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National Mental Health Week – Together We Can Prevent Male Suicide

Thursday, 10 May 2018
National Mental Health Week – Focus on Male Suicide 
In response to the continuing male suicide storyline in Coronation Street, and in advance of National Mental Health Awareness Week next week, Open College Network West Midlands shines a spotlight on male depression, male suicide and sources of help.
Depression, low mood and suicidal thoughts could affect any of us at any time.  We learn, from a very early age, that men and women deal differently with their feelings.
There are different cultural and generational reasons for this line of thought.
Men are “born” leaders – they are the hunters in the “hunter gatherer” community.
Big boys don’t cry – how often is this still said to boys of all ages?  My mother certainly believed that crying was a bad thing and that boys who did it were not “strong”.
Men have to be “strong”.  All those stereotypes and social expectations.
But what happens if you are a man and you don’t feel strong?  What happens if you are a man and you need to talk about how you feel?
Most women talk about their feelings all the time.  Why shouldn’t men talk about how they feel, how something has affected them?
Statistics reveal that 84 men every week in the UK take their own lives.  That’s 84 families affected.
Don’t let it happen to a family you know, to your family.
If you know someone who you think may be depressed or suicidal, encourage them to seek help, encourage them to talk.
There are now a number of campaign aimed at getting men to recognise and deal with their feelings, to confront suicidal thoughts and seek help – and not before time.  Signpost men to the right places – not just the pub – where they can find support and advice.
If you are, or think you are suffering from depression, don’t brush your feelings under the carpet, bring them out into the daylight.
Talk to your mates, talk to your GP, talk to a stranger, just talk and through talking, find a way to help yourself.
Or talk to the professionals – simply click the logo to visit the website:
 
National Mental Health Week – Focus on Male Suicide 
In response to the continuing male suicide storyline in Coronation Street, and in advance of National Mental Health Awareness Week next week, Open College Network West Midlands shines a spotlight on male depression, male suicide and sources of help.
Depression, low mood and suicidal thoughts could affect any of us at any time.  We learn, from a very early age, that men and women deal differently with their feelings.
There are different cultural and generational reasons for this line of thought.
Men are “born” leaders – they are the hunters in the “hunter gatherer” community.
Big boys don’t cry – how often is this still said to boys of all ages?  My mother certainly believed that crying was a bad thing and that boys who did it were not “strong”.
Men have to be “strong”.  All those stereotypes and social expectations.
But what happens if you are a man and you don’t feel strong?  What happens if you are a man and you need to talk about how you feel?
Most women talk about their feelings all the time.  Why shouldn’t men talk about how they feel, how something has affected them?
Statistics reveal that 84 men every week in the UK take their own lives.  That’s 84 families affected.
Don’t let it happen to a family you know, to your family.
If you know someone who you think may be depressed or suicidal, encourage them to seek help, encourage them to talk.
There are now a number of campaign aimed at getting men to recognise and deal with their feelings, to confront suicidal thoughts and seek help – and not before time.  Signpost men to the right places – not just the pub – where they can find support and advice.
If you are, or think you are suffering from depression, don’t brush your feelings under the carpet, bring them out into the daylight.
Talk to your mates, talk to your GP, talk to a stranger, just talk and through talking, find a way to help yourself.
Or talk to the professionals – simply click the logo to visit the website:
 
 
In response to the continuing male suicide storyline in Coronation Street, and in advance of National Mental Health Awareness Week next week, Open College Network West Midlands shines a spotlight on male depression, male suicide and sources of help.
 
Depression, low mood and suicidal thoughts could affect any of us at any time.  We learn, from a very early age, that men and women deal differently with their feelings.
 
There are different cultural and generational reasons for this line of thought.
 
Men are “born” leaders – they are the hunters in the “hunter gatherer” community.
 
Big boys don’t cry – how often is this still said to boys of all ages?  My mother certainly believed that crying was a bad thing and that boys who did it were not “strong”.
 
Men have to be “strong”.  All those stereotypes and social expectations.
 
But what happens if you are a man and you don’t feel strong?  What happens if you are a man and you need to talk about how you feel?
 
Most women talk about their feelings all the time.  Why shouldn’t men talk about how they feel, how something has affected them?
 
 
Statistics reveal that 84 men every week in the UK take their own lives.  That’s 84 families affected.
Don’t let it happen to a family you know, to your family.
 
If you know someone who you think may be depressed or suicidal, encourage them to seek help, encourage them to talk.
 
There are now a number of campaign aimed at getting men to recognise and deal with their feelings, to confront suicidal thoughts and seek help – and not before time.  Signpost men to the right places – not just the pub – where they can find support and advice.
 
If you are, or think you are suffering from depression, don’t brush your feelings under the carpet, bring them out into the daylight.
 
Talk to your mates, talk to your GP, talk to a stranger, just talk and through talking, find a way to help yourself.
 
Or talk to the professionals – simply click the logo to visit the website:
 
 
 
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